Invited Speakers

We are happy to have the following invited speakers that will provide insights into the topic of the workshop from various disciplines and angles:

  • Takayuki Kanda

Takakuki is a Senior Research Scientist at ATR Intelligent Robotics and Communication Laboratories, Kyoto, Japan. He received his B. Eng, M. Eng, and Ph. D. degrees in computer science from Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan, in 1998, 2000, and 2003, respectively. His research interests include human-robot interaction, interactive humanoid robots, and field trials.

Keynote title: Child-robot interaction in a real-world

AbstractWe have studied a couple of real-world scenarios for child-robot interaction, such as learning setting where children study in the presence of robots, and public space setting where robots served for information-providing tasks. Common to these scenarios, children exhibited a great interest to the robots, which sometimes helped the robots to serve for the purpose, but sometimes not. I plan to introduce the scenes of interaction and challenges we faced with, aiming to serve concrete examples of child-robot interaction, in order to facilitate us to discuss the evaluation methods during this workshop.

  • Brian Scasellati

Brian Scassellati is a Professor of Computer Science, Cognitive Science, and Mechanical Engineering at Yale University and Director of the NSF Expedition on Socially Assistive Robotics. His research focuses on building embodied computational models of human social behavior, especially the developmental progression of early social skills. Using computational modeling and socially interactive robots, his research evaluates models of how infants acquire social skills and assists in the diagnosis and quantification of disorders of social development (such as autism). His other interests include humanoid robots, human-robot interaction, artificial intelligence, machine perception, and social learning.

Dr. Scassellati received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2001. His dissertation work (Foundations for a Theory of Mind for a Humanoid Robot) with Rodney Brooks used models drawn from developmental psychology to build a primitive system for allowing robots to understand people. His work at MIT focused mainly on two well-known humanoid robots named Cog and Kismet. He also holds a Master of Engineering in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering (1995), and Bachelors degrees in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering (1995) and Brain and Cognitive Science (1995), all from MIT.

Dr. Scassellati’s research in social robotics and assistive robotics has been recognized within the robotics community, the cognitive science community, and the broader scientific community. He was named an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow in 2007 and received an NSF CAREER award in 2003. His work has been awarded five best-paper awards.

 

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